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Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 232

 

Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 232

3rd Marine Aircraft Wing

VMFA-232 Photos
A U.S. Marine with Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 232 prepares an F/A-18C prior to conducting flight operations at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, May 24, 2017. VMFA 232 is participating in exercise Distant Frontier, which is a unit-level training iteration designed to sharpen participants' tactical combat skills and develop interoperable plans and programs across the joint force. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by 1st Lt. Melissa M. Heisterberg)
Distant Frontier
A U.S. Marine with Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 232 prepares an F/A-18C prior to conducting flight operations at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, May 24, 2017. VMFA 232 is participating in exercise Distant Frontier, which is a unit-level training iteration designed to sharpen participants' tactical combat skills and develop interoperable plans and programs across the joint force. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by 1st Lt. Melissa M. Heisterberg)
A U.S. Marine with Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 232 prepares an F/A-18C prior to conducting flight operations at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, May 24, 2017. VMFA 232 is participating in exercise Distant Frontier, which is a unit-level training iteration designed to sharpen participants' tactical combat skills and develop interoperable plans and programs across the joint force. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by 1st Lt. Melissa M. Heisterberg)
Distant Frontier
A U.S. Marine with Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 232 prepares an F/A-18C prior to conducting flight operations at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, May 24, 2017. VMFA 232 is participating in exercise Distant Frontier, which is a unit-level training iteration designed to sharpen participants' tactical combat skills and develop interoperable plans and programs across the joint force. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by 1st Lt. Melissa M. Heisterberg)
A U.S. Marine with Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 232 prepares an F/A-18C prior to conducting flight operations at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, May 24, 2017. VMFA 232 is participating in exercise Distant Frontier, which is a unit-level training iteration designed to sharpen participants' tactical combat skills and develop interoperable plans and programs across the joint force. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by 1st Lt. Melissa M. Heisterberg)
Distant Frontier
A U.S. Marine with Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 232 prepares an F/A-18C prior to conducting flight operations at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, May 24, 2017. VMFA 232 is participating in exercise Distant Frontier, which is a unit-level training iteration designed to sharpen participants' tactical combat skills and develop interoperable plans and programs across the joint force. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by 1st Lt. Melissa M. Heisterberg)
Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 232 conducts flight operations during exercise Distant Frontier on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, May 17, 2017. Distant Frontier is a unit-level training iteration designed to sharpen participants' tactical combat skills and develop interoperable plans and programs across the joint force. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Lance Cpl. Jacob A. Farbo)
Distant Frontier
Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 232 conducts flight operations during exercise Distant Frontier on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, May 17, 2017. Distant Frontier is a unit-level training iteration designed to sharpen participants' tactical combat skills and develop interoperable plans and programs across the joint force. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Lance Cpl. Jacob A. Farbo)
U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Wyatt Jenkins, an aviation ordnance man with Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 232, catches a F/A-18C during exercise Northern Edge 17 to perform a simulated disarming of a missile on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, on May 12, 2017. Northern Edge 17 is Alaska’s premier joint-training exercise and is conducted to strengthen the interoperability between various aircraft from all services. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jacob A. Farbo)
Northern Edge 17
U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Wyatt Jenkins, an aviation ordnance man with Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 232, catches a F/A-18C during exercise Northern Edge 17 to perform a simulated disarming of a missile on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, on May 12, 2017. Northern Edge 17 is Alaska’s premier joint-training exercise and is conducted to strengthen the interoperability between various aircraft from all services. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jacob A. Farbo)
Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 232 conducts flight operations during exercise Distant Frontier on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, May 17, 2017. Distant Frontier is a unit-level training iteration designed to sharpen participants' tactical combat skills and develop interoperable plans and programs across the joint force. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Lance Cpl. Jacob A. Farbo)
Distant Frontier
Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 232 conducts flight operations during exercise Distant Frontier on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, May 17, 2017. Distant Frontier is a unit-level training iteration designed to sharpen participants' tactical combat skills and develop interoperable plans and programs across the joint force. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Lance Cpl. Jacob A. Farbo)
Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 232 conducts flight operations during exercise Distant Frontier on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, May 17, 2017. Distant Frontier is a unit-level training iteration designed to sharpen participants' tactical combat skills and develop interoperable plans and programs across the joint force. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Lance Cpl. Jacob A. Farbo)
Distant Frontier
Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 232 conducts flight operations during exercise Distant Frontier on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, May 17, 2017. Distant Frontier is a unit-level training iteration designed to sharpen participants' tactical combat skills and develop interoperable plans and programs across the joint force. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Lance Cpl. Jacob A. Farbo)
A Marine with Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 232 "Red Devils" shows an F/A-18C Hornet to his family at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., March 14. More than 150 Marines with VMFA-232 deployed to participate in the unit deployment program at MCAS Iwakuni, Japan, March 14. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jake M.T. McClung/Released)
92 years and still fighting
A Marine with Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 232 "Red Devils" shows an F/A-18C Hornet to his family at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., March 14. More than 150 Marines with VMFA-232 deployed to participate in the unit deployment program at MCAS Iwakuni, Japan, March 14. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jake M.T. McClung/Released)
Several F/A-18C Hornets with Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 232 “Red Devils” rest on the flight line prior to taking off from Marine Corps Air Station Mirimar, Calif., March 11. Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 232 “Red Devils,” the oldest Marine fighter attack squadron, will spend six months training in the Asia-Pacific region and northern America.  (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. David Bickel/Released)
92 years and still fighting
Several F/A-18C Hornets with Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 232 “Red Devils” rest on the flight line prior to taking off from Marine Corps Air Station Mirimar, Calif., March 11. Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 232 “Red Devils,” the oldest Marine fighter attack squadron, will spend six months training in the Asia-Pacific region and northern America. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. David Bickel/Released)
A U.S. Marine Corps pilot taxis his F/A-18C Hornet assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 232 out of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., toward its ramps space after returning to Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, Oct. 10, 2016, after the first combat training mission of RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 17-1. RF-A is a series of Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercises for U.S. and partner nation forces, which enables U.S. Marines in units like VMFA-232 to prepare for future combat and contingency operations in a realistic threat environment inside the largest instrumented air, ground and electronic combat training range in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik)
VMFA-232 ramps up for RED FLAG-Alaska 17-1
A U.S. Marine Corps pilot taxis his F/A-18C Hornet assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 232 out of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., toward its ramps space after returning to Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, Oct. 10, 2016, after the first combat training mission of RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 17-1. RF-A is a series of Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercises for U.S. and partner nation forces, which enables U.S. Marines in units like VMFA-232 to prepare for future combat and contingency operations in a realistic threat environment inside the largest instrumented air, ground and electronic combat training range in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik)
A U.S. Marine Corps F/A-18C Hornet aircraft with Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 232 out of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., taxis past the Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, air traffic control tower Oct. 10, 2016, in preparation for the first RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 17-1 mission. RF-A is a series of Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercises for U.S. and partner nation forces, which enables U.S. Marines in units like VMFA-232 to prepare for future combat and contingency operations in a realistic threat environment inside the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik)
VMFA-232 ramps up for RED FLAG-Alaska 17-1
A U.S. Marine Corps F/A-18C Hornet aircraft with Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 232 out of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., taxis past the Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, air traffic control tower Oct. 10, 2016, in preparation for the first RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 17-1 mission. RF-A is a series of Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercises for U.S. and partner nation forces, which enables U.S. Marines in units like VMFA-232 to prepare for future combat and contingency operations in a realistic threat environment inside the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik)
A U.S. Air Force F-15 Eagle assigned to the 44th Fighter Squadron out of Kadena Air Base, Japan, breaks away from a formation with another F-15 and two U.S. Marine Corps F/A-18C Hornet aircraft assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 232 out of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., as they return to Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, Oct. 10, 2016, after the first RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 17-1 combat training mission. RF-A exercises enable joint and international units to sharpen their skills and build interoperability by flying simulated combat sorties in a realistic threat environment inside the largest instrumented air, ground and electronic combat training range in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik)
VMFA-232 ramps up for RED FLAG-Alaska 17-1
A U.S. Air Force F-15 Eagle assigned to the 44th Fighter Squadron out of Kadena Air Base, Japan, breaks away from a formation with another F-15 and two U.S. Marine Corps F/A-18C Hornet aircraft assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 232 out of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., as they return to Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, Oct. 10, 2016, after the first RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 17-1 combat training mission. RF-A exercises enable joint and international units to sharpen their skills and build interoperability by flying simulated combat sorties in a realistic threat environment inside the largest instrumented air, ground and electronic combat training range in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik)
A pilot assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 232 out of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., taxis his F/A-18C Hornet aircraft down the Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, flight line as U.S. Air Force KC-135 Stratotanker aircraft wait in their ramp space in the background Oct. 10, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 17-1. The Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex provides more than 67,000 square miles of realistic training environment and allows commanders to train for full spectrum engagements, ranging from individual skills to complex, large-scale joint engagements. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik)
VMFA-232 ramps up for RED FLAG-Alaska 17-1
A pilot assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 232 out of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., taxis his F/A-18C Hornet aircraft down the Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, flight line as U.S. Air Force KC-135 Stratotanker aircraft wait in their ramp space in the background Oct. 10, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 17-1. The Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex provides more than 67,000 square miles of realistic training environment and allows commanders to train for full spectrum engagements, ranging from individual skills to complex, large-scale joint engagements. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik)
A U.S. Marine Corps F/A-18C Hornet aircraft from Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 232 out of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., takes off from Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, Oct. 10, 2016, for the first RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 17-1 combat training mission. RF-A enables joint and international units to sharpen their combat skills by flying simulated combat sorties in a realistic threat environment, which allows them to exchange tactics, techniques and procedures while improving interoperability. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik)
VMFA-232 ramps up for RED FLAG-Alaska 17-1
A U.S. Marine Corps F/A-18C Hornet aircraft from Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 232 out of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., takes off from Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, Oct. 10, 2016, for the first RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 17-1 combat training mission. RF-A enables joint and international units to sharpen their combat skills by flying simulated combat sorties in a realistic threat environment, which allows them to exchange tactics, techniques and procedures while improving interoperability. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik)
A pair of U.S. Marine Corps F/A-18C Hornet aircraft assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 232 out of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., returns to Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, Oct. 10, 2016, after the first RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 17-1 combat training mission. RF-A is a series of Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercises for U.S. and partner nation forces, enabling joint and international units like VMFA-232 to sharpen their skills and build interoperability by flying simulated combat sorties in a realistic threat environment inside the largest instrumented air, ground and electronic combat training range in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik)
VMFA-232 ramps up for RED FLAG-Alaska 17-1
A pair of U.S. Marine Corps F/A-18C Hornet aircraft assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 232 out of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., returns to Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, Oct. 10, 2016, after the first RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 17-1 combat training mission. RF-A is a series of Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercises for U.S. and partner nation forces, enabling joint and international units like VMFA-232 to sharpen their skills and build interoperability by flying simulated combat sorties in a realistic threat environment inside the largest instrumented air, ground and electronic combat training range in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik)
MAG-11 Mission Statement

Marine Aircraft Group 11 generates, embarks, and integrates relevant, combat ready aviation forces capable of providing Offensive Air Support, Anti-Aircraft Warfare, Assault Support, Aerial Reconnaissance, and terminal area Control of Aircraft; generates critical aviation logistics support; provides 12 of the functions of Aviation Ground Support; supports the generation of squadrons assigned to Navy Carrier Airwings; trains to standard Marine Fighter/Attack Pilots and Weapons Systems Officers and Navy Strike Fighter Pilots; and prepares to deploy the Marine Aircraft Group Headquarters as a Site Command capable of generating sorties to service standard for the Marine Tactical Air Commander; all in order to ensure success in combat in support of the MAGTF and Combatant Commanders.


VMFA-232 Leaders

Lieutenant Colonel Douglas R. Miller
Commanding Officer, Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 232
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Major Frank A. Machniak Jr.
Executive Officer, Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 232
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Sergeant Major Joseph V. Standifird
Sergeant Major, Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 232
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