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An MV-22B Osprey with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 165 takes off during section confined area landing training in Holtville, Calif., June 29. VMM-165 conducts the training to familiarize new crew chiefs and pilots with missions that they would fly during a deployment. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Pfc. Liah Kitchen/Released)

Photo by Pfc. Liah Kitchen

VMM-165 conducts training to maintain mission readiness

1 Jul 2016 | PFC. Liah Kitchen 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing

Marines with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 165 conducted various forms of training using MV-22B Ospreys in Southern California, June 29.

The squadron conducted the training to familiarize new crew chiefs and pilots with missions that they would fly during a deployment.
According to 1st Lt. Matthew Harris, a pilot with VMM-164, the main purpose of these missions is to be able to get in and out of a zone quickly, to get the Marines on the ground or to get them whatever supplies they need to complete their missions.

“We need to conduct the training to be able to maneuver in a high threat environment,” said Sgt. Kevin Rodriguez, a crew chief with VMM-165. “Furthering the proficiency of the squadron enables us to be capable of landing anywhere the Marine Corps needs us to land.”

Marines with VMM-165 performed attack formations, section confined area landings and then transitioned into instrument training.
During attack maneuvers, pilots fly the aircraft in various formations in order to avoid potential threats to the Marines in the air.
The CALs training gives the Marines the confidence needed to be able to land and take off in small areas, around objects and other aircraft.

Later in the day the pilots also practiced low altitude approaches, using only the instruments used in low visibility situations.

According to Rodriguez, during this training it is important for the crew to understand their role and communicate so that they can complete any mission that they undertake.

“Our job as the air unit is to support the Marines on the ground,” said Harris. “Whether we’re dropping Marines off, getting casualties out or being able to come into a zone quickly to avoid any threats that might endanger us, it all comes back to the Marines on the ground and completing the mission.”

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