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3rd Marine Aircraft Wing

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A KC-130J Hercules flown by pilots with Marine Aerial Refueler Transport Squadron (VMGR) 352 “Raiders” flies over mountainous terrain during low-level tactical navigation training outside of Yuma, Ariz., July 24. The training allowed pilots to earn qualifications, known as codes, under the instruction of a flight commander.
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1st Lt. Alisa Sieber, co-pilot with Marine Aerial Refueler Transport Squadron (VMGR) 352 “Raiders,” flies a KC-130J Hercules during low-level tactical navigation training outside of Yuma, Ariz., July 24. This was Sieber’s first time flying low-level tactical navigation, earning her an initial qualification for the training.
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Capt. Luke Roberts, a flight commander with Marine Aerial Refueler Transport Squadron (VMGR) 352 “Raiders,” guides his co-pilot during low-level tactical navigation training with a KC-130J Hercules outside of Yuma, Ariz., July 24. Flight commanders teach pilots and ensure they are mission ready.
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Navy Cmdr. Ellis Gayles, left, aeromedical safety officer and director of safety and standardization with 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing, looks out the cockpit window of a KC-130J Hercules during low-level tactical navigation training outside of Yuma, Ariz., July 24. Gayles attended the training flight to observe the pilots and crews in order to better understand what they endure during flight.
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Sgt. Carl Kilpatrick, crew master with Marine Aerial Refueler Transport Squadron (VMGR) 352 “Raiders,” attaches a ground wire to a KC-130J Hercules after completing low-level tactical navigation training outside of Yuma, Ariz., July 24. During the training, the Raiders fly low and use terrain such as mountains, hills, valleys or trees to simulate evading detection by enemy radar systems.
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Crew chiefs with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 166 watch the sunset outside of an MV-22B Osprey near the end of a training exercise flying back to Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., July 24. The flight included confined area landing and tactical formations.
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Two MV-22B Ospreys with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 166 get refueled before continuing a training exercise at the Grand Canyon, July 24. The Grand Canyon was the turning point during the exercise with VMM-166.
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Lance Cpl. Jodi Esp, a crew chief with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 166 monitors gas refueling for an MV-22B Osprey at the Grand Canyon, July 24. The Grand Canyon was the turning point during a training exercise with VMM-166.
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Crew chiefs with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 166 keep watch outside of an MV-22B Osprey during a training flight from Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., July 24. The flight included confined-area landing and tactical-formations.
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An MV-22B Osprey with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 166 flies alongside another Osprey during a training exercise from Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., July 24. The flight included confined-area landing and tactical formations.
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An engineer equipment electrical systems technician, or generator mechanic, with Combat Logistics Company 11, Combat Logistics Regiment 15, disassembles a broken fuel injector while repairing a generator aboard Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., July 22. Generator mechanics attend the Marine Corps Engineer School in Courthouse Bay, Camp Lejeune, N.C., for more than five months to learn about the different generators used in the Marine Corps.
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Lance Cpl. Gus O’Brien, an engineer equipment electrical systems technician, or generator mechanic, with Combat Logistics Company 11, Combat Logistics Regiment 15, looks over his work before continuing repairs on a generator aboard Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., July 22. While in school generator mechanics learn troubleshooting skills, electrical theory and concepts, organizational and intermediate repair techniques, and mechanical skills – all the skills necessary to make them an asset in the Marine Corps.
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Lance Cpl. Gus O’Brien, an engineer equipment electrical systems technician, or generator mechanic, with Combat Logistics Company 11, Combat Logistics Regiment 15, searches for a dropped tool during repairs on a generator aboard Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., July 22. While deployed, Marines like O’Brien can provide repairs and prolong the use of generators responsible for powering equipment used in operations and missions for several months.
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Lance Cpl. Gus O’Brien, an engineer equipment electrical systems technician, or generator mechanic, with Combat Logistics Company 11, Combat Logistics Regiment 15, disassembles a generator while taking out a broken fuel injector aboard Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., July 22. O’Brien is part of a third-echelon repair shop, meaning he repairs generators other units cannot repair themselves due to restrictions in the technical manual.
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Lance Cpl. Gus O’Brien, an engineer equipment electrical systems technician, or generator mechanic, with Combat Logistics Company 11, Combat Logistics Regiment 15, holds a successfully detached fuel injector aboard Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif., July 22. O’Brien is responsible for making repairs on generators for use in many different environments for different uses such as powering communications equipment, medical equipment, lights, air conditioning and heat as well as setting up airfields or ground refueling points.
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LtCol Anderson
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